Home > Rocket > How did the GoFast 2014 Rocket de-spin?

How did the GoFast 2014 Rocket de-spin?

Habboin 04/11/2021 Rocket 157
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In this awesome Youtube video of HD footage from the GoFast 2014 Rocket, a de-spin maneuver is performed. Is this a yo-yo de-spin?

You can see the de-spin at 0:57 and at 3:47, where it really looks like a bolo is flying away, but I can't be certain. It's only a few frames and it's not possible to slow-mo Youtube videos (or frame advance). YouTube frame advance. Pause video. Press period key to advance and comma key to back up one frame at a time.

The video is great - even though there is no sound in space, the vibrations of the craft are picked up by the cameras.

Steve Steve

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I don't have any direct information but I can't think of anything else it could be.

If it were roll thrusters (cold gas or monoprop) you'd expect to see much slower response (because you'd want them to be no larger/heavier than necessary), they'd have continuous control, and there would be controller artifacts -- overshoot or undershoot.

I don't think a reaction wheel of any reasonable flywheel/battery mass could give that kind of performance.

The sound on the video seems consistent with an unwinding cable of some kind - rasp-and-clunk, with the deceleration on the clunk.

answered Jul 9 '16 at 2:35

Russell Borogove Russell Borogove

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I shortly after found this video, which confirms it's a yo-yo de-spin.

I wonder why this guy called his video "flat Earth dome". I didn't spend any time looking at his other videos, but it appears he's a flat Earth believer, and if so, can't be trusted...

I would like to have a more reputable source.

answered Jul 9 '16 at 2:18

Steve Steve

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Around 03:45 in the linked video you can see (both?) Yo-Yo(s) deployed and move away from the spacecraft. The frame with the red box shows a small object which may be some retainer, followed by the Yo-Yo masses themselves.

There is another object fixed near the horizons, which is likely to be the just-past-full Moon on July 14, 2014 at 07:32 local time in New Mexico as shown by a screen shot from in-the-sky.org.

answered Oct 16 '17 at 0:31

uhoh uhoh

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